Global – Softwood lumber trade increasing with prices firming in US and Canada

23 May 2012

After a sharp decline in global demand for lumber in 208 and 2009 as a result of the global recession, global trade of softwood lumber increased an estimated 25 percent over the last two years. The Middles East/North African region has had a growing appetite for lumber for its construction sector; and the region imported 36% more lumber in 2010 than 2007. This steady upward trend was interrupted last year when the Egyptian revolution, the civil war in Libya and riots in Algeria created chaos and uncertainty in the region.

Lumber prices in the US and Canada have gone up most of this year, reaching the highest levels since early 2011. Lumber prices, both domestic and imported, have fallen steadily for over six months in Japan in dollar terms, and many grades are at their lowest levels since early 2010.

Lumber prices both domestic and imported, have fallen steadily for over six months in Japan in dollar terms, and many grades are at the lowest levels since early 2010. Softwood lumber imports to China were up 3% in 1Q/12 as compared to 1Q/11. The biggest increase in the last few years has been the shipments from Canada.

After a sharp decline in global demand for lumber in 208 and 2009 as a result of the global recession, global trade of softwood lumber increased an estimated 25 percent over the last two years. The Middles East/North African region has had a growing appetite for lumber for its construction sector; and the region imported 36% more lumber in 2010 than 2007. This steady upward trend was interrupted last year when the Egyptian revolution, the civil war in Libya and riots in Algeria created chaos and uncertainty in the region.

Lumber prices in the US and Canada have gone up most of this year, reaching the highest levels since early 2011. Lumber prices, both domestic and imported, have fallen steadily for over six months in Japan in dollar terms, and many grades are at their lowest levels since early 2010.

Lumber prices both domestic and imported, have fallen steadily for over six months in Japan in dollar terms, and many grades are at the lowest levels since early 2010. Softwood lumber imports to China were up 3% in 1Q/12 as compared to 1Q/11. The biggest increase in the last few years has been the shipments from Canada.